Dr Neville Bolt

Dr Neville Bolt

Director of the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC), Editor-in-Chief, Defence Strategic Communications journal

Great Britain

Dr Neville Bolt is the Director of the King’s Centre for Strategic Communications (KCSC), a leading global centre of expertise in strategic communications. He is also Editor-in-Chief of Defence Strategic Communications, the peer reviewed academic journal of NATO Strategic Communications Centre of Excellence.

Dr Bolt is convenor of the Masters programme in Strategic Communications in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. He has co-convened the Masters course ‘Evolution of Insurgency and Counterinsurgency’. And he teaches the International Relations course ‘Transnational Movements, Networks and Revolutionary Strategy’. He is supervisor to PhD students researching topics including empathy in international negotiations; trust in the revolutionary theatre; counter-conduct & democratic dissent; materiality of communication in urban space; metaphors of containment in the Cold War. He was the Teaching Excellence Award Winner 2017.

Much of his career was spent as a television journalist and producer-director at the BBC, ITV, and CBC (Canada). Working in news and current affairs, he specialised in the production of war zone documentaries covering conflicts in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and Indian subcontinent. Later he created strategic communications campaigns with the British Labour Party, Amnesty International, and the African National Congress (ANC)/Anti-Apartheid Movement.

His book The Violent Image: Insurgent Propaganda and the New Revolutionaries (Columbia University Press) was published in 2012. It received the CHOICE ‘outstanding academic status award’ 2013. He is currently writing two books: The Future Came Too Soon – State and Insurgency in the Digital Age; and Disinformation & The Human Condition.

Looking outside the bubble – the global view (Livestream)

Main Stage

What can we gain from taking a look beyond our own borders and learning from the experience of others? This session widens the debate beyond the Euro-Atlantic region to understand how available and emerging technologies affect social processes across the globe. As societies worldwide struggle in the face of seismic shifts brought on by new technology, governments need to balance top-down intervention and civil liberties. Fresh vulnerabilities have opened up for exploitation by malign actors wishing to influence political decision-making and public debate. Sharing ideas and working together is a good way forward – can we combine existing strengths and avoid replicating mistakes?

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